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What to Ask Your Doctor About Knee Pain 

If you’re suffering from knee pain, you may be wondering what to ask your doctor. Knee pain can limit your ability to do the things you love. It can limit your ability to climb stairs, get into and out of a car, pivot, step up from a curb, and much more. It can even prevent you from playing sports such as tennis, golf, or dancing. Ultimately, your quality of life is greatly reduced. 

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Tendonitis 

Your physician will examine your knee to determine whether you have tendonitis or another underlying medical condition. He or she will ask about your medical history, physical activities, and pain level. You should also mention any underlying medical conditions. Your physician may suggest tests to rule out other causes of knee pain. During a physical exam, your physician will feel the affected area to assess its range of motion. 

Osteoarthritis 

A doctor can diagnose osteoarthritis in the knee through a clinical examination and determine if the disease is the underlying cause of your symptoms. The condition is characterized by joint inflammation and pain, swelling, and stiffness, which make daily activities painful. Symptoms can worsen during activity or after sitting down for a prolonged period. However, there is no way to reverse the condition. Treatment options are limited but can reduce the pain and swelling. 

Osgood-Schlatter’s disease 

Although symptoms of Osgood-Schlatter’s Disease usually subside without treatment, they can last several months. For the first two to three months, rest is the best remedy for this type of knee pain. During this time, you may be able to resume physical activity with reduced intensity. If your symptoms persist after a week of rest, you may need to modify your activities. If you’re an athlete, you may benefit from an icepack or a BraceAbility cold compression knee brace. 

Osteotomy 

An osteotomy procedure can correct several conditions affecting the knee, including a deformity that limits joint motion or an uneven surface. The procedure involves cutting a portion of the shin, femur, or tibia, and realigning the joint. Depending on the nature of the problem, the procedure can provide substantial pain relief and increased function. This procedure may be performed on patients who are younger than 40 and have osteoarthritis that is confined to one compartment of the knee. 

Arthroplasty 

Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure in which a damaged piece of bone or cartilage is removed from a joint. In a knee replacement, a man-made part is replaced in its place. Arthroplasty is performed on the thigh and shin bones, which connect the kneecap. The replacement part, made of plastic or metal, can be inserted into the joint to restore function and pain relief.